A nationwide study of 1000 adults finds 70% could not identify examples of IP

The survey findings indicate that there is a serious need to raise Americans’ IP awareness. USIPA was created to inform and educate the public. Millions of jobs and billions of dollars are at stake.”
— Scott Frank, Founder, Chairman and President, USIPA

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, USA, October 17, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — More than half of Americans believe they understand what copyrights, patents and trademarks are for. But according to a new survey conducted by the United States Intellectual Property Alliance (USIPA), a non-profit, they are thoroughly confused.

Based on a survey of 1,000 adults conducted earlier this year by a national market research firm, around two-thirds of respondents, 66%, indicated they understood what intellectual property rights protect. Yet when asked to provide examples of IP, 70% of those surveyed could not.

USIPA was established in 2020 to address the American public’s appreciation of intellectual property. The organization is in the process of creating alliances in every state to conduct local educational activities that raise the level of IP understanding.

USIPA has attracted approximately 100 board members from a broad range of U.S. industries, IP organizations and professionals. The Alliance is led by co-chairpersons David Kappos, former Director of the U.S. Patent, Trademark Office and Chief Judge of the Federal Circuit Paul Michel (ret), and Joyce Ward, Director of Education of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

“Intellectual property encourages creators to provide what people want and need.” said Scott Frank, USIPA Founder, President and Chair. “The survey findings indicate that there is a serious need to raise Americans’ IP awareness. USIPA was created to inform and educate the public. Millions of jobs and billions of dollars are at stake.”

Lack of Information

The survey indicated that about half of those responding, 52%, felt IP definitely had a “positive impact” on society. Another 26% said the impact was more positive than negative. As it relates to copyright and trademarks, less than half, 41%, believed IP definitely has a positive impact. Survey respondents were highly uninformed about the rules involving IP. Less than one-third of those surveyed knew that the USPTO can invalidate an issued patent previously upheld by a federal judge. Approximately four in five, 81%, said they had not read or heard anything about patent law in the media or were unsure if they had.

These findings and others will be discussed at the inaugural meeting of USIPA in Atlanta October 20. At the event the Alliance will map out its strategy for working to build state alliances and providing them with materials and guidance to improve the understanding of IP nationwide. Survey respondents were taken from a wide range of geography, age, education and income.

“Intellectual property plays an increasing role in the U.S. economy,” said Frank. “If we hope to flourish globally a better appreciation of the value that IP provides business and society is essential.”

For more information about the U.S. IP Alliance, visit www.usipalliance.org.

Michael Waring
U.S. IP Alliance
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